This is a sponsored post written by TechDigg on behalf of TeeChip.Com for IZEA. All opinions are 100% ours.

Advertisement

From the deep dark days of the 1970s (at least so I am told) ‘Do It Yourself’ independence has been a major factor in some of the best and most creative projects. Did  you know that the first Hellraiser movie was a $1,000,000 independent film Clive Barker wrote, produced, directed and fund-raised himself?  Making the accomplishments of independent thinkers such as creators; Clive Baker, the Beatles and early punk bands like Dead Kennedys and Bad Religion all the more impressive is they were doing it all analog. Not for them the ease of Garage Band, Youtube and iTunes.

Then there is TeeChip

With the help of new media it is now easier than ever to produce and distribute ones’ own creative content and, in some cases, even make money from it. Gone are the days of laboring away or what turn out to be labors of love with nary a cent being made from it. As Youtube nerdcore rapper Dr. Awkward puts it on his track “Different”: “I was doing shows in every corner of the globe before I ever saw a dollar for three albums worth of flows.” Now there is TeeChip.

The miracle of merch

Bringing technology to bear on the world of self-promotion and publishing, much as how on-demanding printing did for books, TeeChip is based  on many different existing platforms from crowdfunding to on-demand merchant creation, using them as sort of hybrid way that no one has ever thought of using before. Basically, a custom printing service with an online presence, TeeChip will put any design you like on anything from shirts to mugs to cell-phone cases to full-sized posters, to then sell on your site to both make money.  Making money can come from the merchandising itself and to spread the word out about a designers’ creative projects. Even if what one wants to do is sell cleverly designed shirts and posters, TeeChip taking the headache out of actual production, and to a certain point promotion, leaving you to focus on design.

TeeChip cares and they have a lot to show for it

Far from a cold, heartless, multi-national corporation bent on world domination, TeeChip is run by real people who honestly care. Through the initiative TeeChip Cares, TeeChip donates unused products to non-governmental organizations to be distributed to those who may be in need of a nice warm hoodie.

In addition to providing high quality shirts for distribution for those in need, they have changed the lives for those that use the service to earn a living. It has given the ability for designers to have a creative outlet, as well as a sense of freedom from finances that had not been experienced prior to TeeChip.

Virtual cash

TeeChip can be a great way to make money online. Similar to services such as cdbaby.com, the site will take care of everything required for a campaign from printing to shipping. All the creator has to do is bring their design and the cash for the raw materials.

The convenience of working with this company is unparalleled as they will print and ship directly to your customers. When they say they make it easy, they absolutely mean it. You bring the design, they do everything else.

Top shelf products at affordable cost

There is a convenient page on the main site showing exactly the type of merchandise available to carry your brilliant and witty designs, along with unit prices which tend to be along the lines of wholesale; $5.95 for a plain, short-sleeved tee shirt for example.

Quality you can trust

You can have confidence in TeeChip, they have even provided their own review site where you can go and say exactly what you think about them. It can be found here. The fact they are willing to be so transparent and to solicit unbiased reviews should give one complete confidence that this is a company that will do what it takes to ensure you receive a satisfying and smooth experience with them.

Visit Sponsors Site

Previous articleNo more wine stains with this wine repellent shirt
Next articleHere’s what would happen if you fell through the center of the Earth
Trevor McNeil spent much of his childhood playing video-games on early-form personal computers back when the disks were literally floppy. He attended the University of Victoria, completing a degree in Social Science with a concentration in Technology In Society, while also writing for the campus newspaper. He has written articles for such diverse publications as Humanity Death Watch, PopMatters and Perfect Sound Forever. He is a veteran of numerous “watershed moments” in the history of technological development and firmly believes that Han shot first.