While it might put some noses out of joint to say so, particularly in the more superstitious quarters, humans really are members of the Animal Kingdom. There is, of course, our close link with the primate family. Look closely at the ol’ human skeleton. We can’t exactly regrow body parts, but we have tails in a technical sense.

As Tim Minchin put it once ‘we’re all just f***king monkeys in shoes’. It turns out that we may share a chromosome or two with other, even ‘lower’ species.

How low you ask. Hate to break it to you, but David Icke might be right. Not that we are human/lizard hybrids. That is as daft as denim at the opera. No, not space lizards, but regular, earth bound, desert dwelling ones.

Despite some of our homo sapien numbers being described as ‘cold blooded’, almost certainly meaning it in a metaphorical sense, it turns out that hidden somewhere in our DNA is the ability to regenerate and regrow teeth and parharps even regrow body parts. Almost enough to make one wonder what other neat, lizard-ish talents we might have. For example, might it be possible for humans to regrow lost limbs.

PRECEDENCE

Advertisement

regrow body parts

(Look at: How cat behavior can have a powerful impact on space travel) 

Strange as it might seem, the very notion that humans might be able to regrow body parts but keep in mind that bio-feedback is more or less accepted by the scientific community of being a real thing with actual, if somewhat limited effects.

For the uninitiated, biofeedback, in the most technical way is ‘a process whereby electronic monitoring of a normally automatic bodily function is used to train someone to acquire voluntary control of that function.’

Among those functions is to regenerate body matter. There have been cases of people, regenerating skin to heal wounds faster and replacing blood faster than science previously thought possible.

What science today says about regrow body parts

regrow body parts

Also look at: Great new technology, how would someone from 1957 react?

 According to some sources in the media, they have been around for a while so are probably true, there are scientists in Germany, of all places,  observing known regenerative species such as salamanders, trying to figure out how they grow back their tails.

Well darn it if they did not do just that. Armed with this information, researches at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology Genetics in Dresden, or Dr. Jochen Rink to be familiar, managed to coax a non-regenerative species of worm to regrow its head, after the Tutonic maniacs beheaded the poor creature.

LOOK MA! NEW HANDS!

While a far cry from what might be considered ‘human’ trials, some people being called ‘worms’, though again in a metaphorical sense, we really do have a thing for animal analogies in our insults, it is a step in the right direction.

Scientifically speaking a mouse-based experiment would be more applicable by they are probably just too cute to execute.

Still, though, if a non-regenerative species can be convinced to come back from the dead with a whole new head, it should be a Sunday walk in the park for a potentially, basically, if we try really hard regenerative species like ours to pull off the same trick.

Comments

comments

Previous articleHow were germs discovered anyway?
Next articleDiscover the country where drawing blood is less painful 
Trevor McNeil spent much of his childhood playing video-games on early-form personal computers back when the disks were literally floppy. He attended the University of Victoria, completing a degree in Social Science with a concentration in Technology In Society, while also writing for the campus newspaper. He has written articles for such diverse publications as Humanity Death Watch, PopMatters and Perfect Sound Forever. He is a veteran of numerous “watershed moments” in the history of technological development and firmly believes that Han shot first.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here