One of the most terrible things on the Internet today is revenge porn. It’s quite disturbing as it throws victims in an emotionally driven rampage. It’s something that has ruined a lot of lives, and there’s no end in sight.

When folks are looking to hurt someone with revenge porn, usually the content is posted on an amateur porn website then shared to social media. Facebook is one of the main places for a person to share revenge porn, and the company knows, which is why it’s stepping up its game to get the situation under control.

Just recently on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, Facebook announced the availability of a new tool designed to prevent people from sharing revenge porn content on the social network. From what we’ve come to understand, it only works with content the social network has pulled down before. This means folks with the intention of resharing hurtful sexual content will find it difficult.

The system will also warn rule breakers that the content they are attempting to upload violate the policies set by Facebook.

Who are the most affected?

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According to a recent study by the Center for Innovative Public Health Research, 17 percent of those affected by revenge porn on a yearly basis are folks who are lesbian, gay, or bisexual, while only two percent of person’s who identify as straight are targeted.

The Civil Rights Initiative claims 82 percent of people tormented by revenge porn have seen increased problems in their work and social lives.

Now, we must point out that studies are never perfect; hence, the numbers seen here should be viewed with a bit of skepticism.

The type of technology Facebook is using

The technology used by the social network is nothing new, but effective. It’s a photo-matching tool known as Microsoft’s PhotoDNA. Both companies came together in the past to fight child porn, and so far, the tool turned out to be a huge success.

PhotoDNA is interesting because it transforms an image to greyscale, then proceeds to break them up into tiny pieces. The tool then adds a special number to each piece, ultimately creating a signature that is stored in the main database.

Whenever someone uploads an image, the system cross-references the information based on what is currently available. If it picks up any problems, it goes into block mode and from there the user gets a warning.

Over the years, folks have committed suicide due to revenge porn, and as such, tech companies and lawmakers are doing everything in their power to get a lid on the problem.

[More: It is Now Legal for Internet Service Providers to Sell Your Sensitive Data]

Comments

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2 COMMENTS

  1. And that’s why my social media info doesn’t match with my real info, I remember when people started to complain about the rules of Facebook and Instagram as they payed for a service and suddenly they are charging them more, I know we pay in some way, because they gather the info and use it for ads and who know what else, but aren’t we silly if we simply share the info we don’t want to be share?

    It’s nice to see how even tho the companies take care of some topics, and so far I feel like some org should teach to have common sense. Don’t record/picture yourself where you are doing something you don’t want to share.

  2. Well this is ok for their average subscriber base…BUT it’s all TALK excepting when it comes to their ZUCKERBERG’s Personal Politics, which Facebook will continue to be ONLY ABOUT THEMSELVES.

    THAT is their priority.

    HOW MUCH have they sold our Country OUT, by SECRETLY sucking up to THE OBAMA REGIME ?

    This limp-wristed complaint, APPARENTLY, fell on a pair BIG DEAF EARS !

    Mark Zuckerberg: I Called Obama Over NSA Spying

    Denver Nicks
    Mar 13, 2014

    http://time.com/23925/mark-zuckerberg-i-called-obama-over-state-spying/

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